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Jonathan Addo
Jonathan Addo
  • Jonathan Addo

  • Partner
  • British Virgin Islands
Jeremy Child
Jeremy Child
  • Jeremy Child

  • Partner
  • London
Julie Engwirda
Julie Engwirda
  • Julie Engwirda

  • Partner
  • Hong Kong
Peter Ferrer
Peter Ferrer
  • Peter Ferrer

  • Partner
  • British Virgin Islands
Claire Goldstein
Claire Goldstein
  • Claire Goldstein

  • Partner
  • British Virgin Islands
Hazel-Ann Hannaway
Hazel-Ann Hannaway
  • Hazel-Ann Hannaway

  • Partner
  • British Virgin Islands
Nick Hoffman
Nick Hoffman
  • Nick Hoffman

  • Partner
  • Cayman Islands
Andrew Johnstone
Andrew Johnstone
  • Andrew Johnstone

  • Partner
  • Hong Kong
Paula Kay
Paula Kay
  • Paula Kay

  • Partner
  • Hong Kong
Phillip Kite
Phillip Kite
  • Phillip Kite

  • Partner
  • British Virgin Islands
Vicky Lord
Vicky Lord
  • Vicky Lord

  • Partner
  • Shanghai
Paul Madden
Paul Madden
  • Paul Madden

  • Partner
  • Cayman Islands
Henry Mander
Henry Mander
  • Henry Mander

  • Partner
  • Cayman Islands
Ian Mann
Ian Mann
  • Ian Mann

  • Partner
  • Hong Kong
William Peake
William Peake
  • William Peake

  • Partner
  • London
Lorinda Peasland
Lorinda Peasland
  • Lorinda Peasland

  • Consultant
  • Hong Kong
Chai Ridgers
Chai Ridgers
  • Chai Ridgers

  • Partner
  • Hong Kong
Nicola Roberts
Nicola Roberts
  • Nicola Roberts

  • Partner
  • Hong Kong
  • Singapore
Paul Smith
Paul Smith
  • Paul Smith

  • Partner
  • Cayman Islands
Andrew Thorp
Andrew Thorp
  • Andrew Thorp

  • Partner
  • British Virgin Islands
Jessica Williams
Jessica Williams
  • Jessica Williams

  • Partner
  • Cayman Islands
Jayson Wood
Jayson Wood
  • Jayson Wood

  • Partner
  • Cayman Islands

10 minutes with Chief Registrar Shiona Allenger

We are delighted to introduce Chief Registrar Shiona Allenger of the Cayman Islands who recently provided some critical insight about technology in the courts.

What are your responsibilities? 

Being the Registrar of the Financial Services Division of the Grand Court Cayman Islands, I am accountable to interpret the rules of court correctly.  My role includes: (1) reviewing each application to ensure that  it is filed in conformity with the various laws, regulations etc; (2) overseeing the administration required to ensure the court operates efficiently and within the appropriate legislative and practice directions/requirements; (3) Liaising with the Hon Chief Justice Anthony Smellie for assignment of cases (considering the expertise of the Judges and any previous involvement in similar cases in the past); (4) corresponding with the assigned Judge and advising the relevant parties.  The duties and responsibilities are vast but I appreciate and embrace the challenges that arise.

Does having an mba assist in your role? 

I believe that having an MBA does provide an advantage in that it has provided me with the window of opportunity to view certain areas within the courts from a different perspective and allows me to bring new and broader innovative ideas to the table. Having an MBA demonstrates in my humble opinion, your commitment to the business because you’ve invested the substantial time and energy required to obtaining a positive end result.  It shows that you value the business perspective and recognize that the technology you implement, support and develop is intended to enable business activities and is not an end in itself.  Having this edge also indicates that you’ve mastered a certain level of knowledge in business management, which gives you the ability and confidence to speak on equal terms with executives outside of IT.  We need to bear in mind that IT touches nearly every part of the modern business enterprise, and the Courts is a business, may not be listed as such in the traditional terms, and because IT managers are increasingly involved in business processes, it adds credibility I feel to my perspective when discussing technical solutions to business problems with my colleagues.

What are some of the features of e-filing that will be beneficial?

Throughout the past few years, Courts throughout England, United States and Canada have implemented e-filing rules to mainstream and reduce the paper filing of legal documents. Many attorneys have welcomed e-filing practices, but the public at large are still skeptical about the practicality of electronically filing documents with the court. Judicial e-filing systems allow registered users to file and review legal documents online any time of day (most e-filing systems are available 24 hours on a daily basis). A document will be deemed submitted for filing when the electronic filing system receives the document. This allows individuals to not have to rush to court to file their documents on time in addition to reducing long waiting lines in court’s office. Certain types of cases are only allowed to be filed electronically. This of course can be checked with the court rules to see which ones. One major advantage would allow legal professionals (attorneys and paralegals) to receive notices, orders, and judgments from the court electronically.

Will attorneys be able to pay Court fees online?

Most definitely, attorneys as well as lay persons will have the ability afforded to them to make payment online should they wish to do so.

Will filings be secure from online hacking?

Cyber Security is of upmost importance not only to the Judiciary but also the Government of the Cayman Islands. Initiatives and risk assessments have been put in place to ensure and enforce the security of all court documents and proceedings.  What is of utmost importance and should be noted is that, as risk assessment programs mature, it becomes obvious that anticipating and preparing for trouble is better than responding to it. For true risk reduction, we have to replace old security measures with sensible and more current security and risk assessments that will diligently and methodically follow proven risk reduction procedures.

What technology is used in trials in Cayman?

The Judiciary has made careful investments with respect to the legal infrastructure in accordance with the protocols set by the Cayman Islands’ government, in collaboration with leading local law firms since the establishment in 2009 of the Financial Services Division of the Grand Court (FSD). A development that has resulted, in the Grand Court being expertly equipped to handle the particular needs of a matter of the size and sophistication such as the AHAB case now in progress.

In preparing for such a matter and ensuring that the technology is in place, Judicial Administration Court Administrator, Ms Suzanne Bothwell, provided and oversaw the necessary preparations including ongoing case management requirements for the Hon Chief Justice and liaised between the Judicial office and local law firms to ensure the court facilities were modified appropriately to accommodate the expansive case.

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